Featured Artists

March, 2020

Celebrating four women artists!

Jill Peckelun

ART IS THE SUBCONSCIOUS MADE CONSCIOUS, THE BREATH OF THE FAMILIAR INTO A NEW VISION, THE AWAKENING OF ALL SENSES

I consider myself to be simply a painter whose work continues to evolve.  But I understand folks want a little more definition than that.  So, I could describe my artistic style to be in line with the Post Impressionists and the immediacy of working from life.  Most of my paintings are based upon direct observation.   The process is about layers of depth, shapes of light and dark values, movement, mood, and lively color.  I spend a lot of time preparing sketches and working out compositions.  I take a little bit from here, a little bit from there.  Each piece is representative of a time and place, but not at all literal.

This past summer it was sometimes hot hot hot…too hot for me and my dog Daisy to paint outside.  So, we took advantage of some old buildings steeped in the history of a working farm and painted interiors.  Is it still plein air painting if the door is open?

Emily Thompson

“My paintings document the ordinary, the everyday, the disappearing, the nostalgic, the abandoned and the identity of the American landscape. Inspiration comes from my surroundings – urban and industrial scenery, roadside and rural locations and vintage signage and typography. My work is about design, atmosphere, mood, color, the application of paint and texture.”

“Emily Thompson creates intimate gestures that are drawn from large scale subject matter. She is attracted to the remnants of a nostalgic past. Working with usual site lines, she is drawn to the deterioration of once pulsating, vibrant signs, and the linear qualities of architecture, electrical wires, roadways and horizon lines.” – Lisa Tremper Hanover, Museum Curator

Emily attended the prestigious High School of Art & Design and earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree from the School of Visual Arts in New York. She is a nationally-recognized, award-winning artist. Through her painting Emily documents the ordinary, the everyday, the disappearing, the nostalgic, the abandoned and the identity of the American landscape. Inspiration comes from her surroundings – urban and industrial scenery, roadside and rural locations and vintage signage and typography. Her work is about design, atmosphere, mood, color, the application of paint and texture. Thompson’s work is part of private collections throughout the United States and has been exhibited at the Woodmere Museum in Philadelphia, The Philadelphia Sketch Club, The Trenton City Museum, The Monmouth Museum and the John F. Peto Museum in New Jersey, as well as galleries in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and California.  She was chosen as one of the 50 Most Memorable Artists of 2015 by The Artists Portfolio Magazine, was featured in the June 2017 issue of The Artist’s Magazine and included as part of Artists We’re Loving Now: 30 Competition Winners of The Artists Magazine, March 2018 Issue.

Alicia Irwin

“In a world that seems to be moving a million miles a minute, we as a society, long for simpler times. Nostalgia is a universal thing that will never die. Each generation has made their own imprint on pop culture, instrumentation and technology on humanity, history and ultimately time. Time is an element and a factor that humanity is forced to deal with, whether it wants to or not. The world keeps spinning on its axes. Sometimes that aches, and sometimes that forces us forward and onto new things. Sometimes it heals what was once gaping wounds. It’s a universal example of cause and effect. There is no standing still, as there is no backwards, only forward. From the beginning of the planning phase, to the drying signature on the paper, conscious care and thoughtfulness is given to ensure the authenticity and history of the object, while also securing overall visual design, which is critical to the work.”

Alicia Irwin was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania in 1985. Three years at Millersville University gave Alicia the elements and principals of art and design, which she weighs carefully with each piece from start to finish. Specializing in mediums consisting of both graphite and charcoal, she renders objects in a hyper realistic state. Often her work is mistaken for photographs, with haunting beauty, and striking precision. The development of her own process and application techniques, allow her to capture the subject matter in such a meticulous, and some would say, obsessive detail, rendering a vivid, true-to-life, 2-dimensional image. But there is real delicacy in her conscious planning and execution, while maintaining the utmost care to retain the objects visual and historical integrity.

 

 

Beth Bathe

Beth Bathe, a nationally known plein air painter, and juried artist in over ten national competitions and was a featured artist in the 2018 February/March issue of PleinAir Magazine.
Her painting style is unique, looking somewhat like a watercolor, or is it an oil painting? Beth uses Cobra Water Mixable Oil Colors in thin washes with a limited palette, using unconventional tools such as squeegees and q-tips along with her brushes. Her paintings evoke a nostalgia of an old sepia toned photograph. She is highly influenced by Andrew Wyeth, and her subject matter is often that of the “vanishing landscape”, buildings, barns and old towns of a time gone by.

Curiosity about the medium Beth works is often the first question of many viewers. Is it watercolor, is it oil? Beth’s answer: “somewhat both.” She works with Water Mixable Oil Colors in a limited tonalist palette, using both brushes and a handful of unconventional tools.  Painting primary on location allows Beth to catch her subject at a specific time, ideally when the light and shadows play on the surface creating drama and emotion. From Lancaster PA, she teaches classes and leads workshops at her studio, Short Dog Studio, in Ephrata, PA, where she shares her space with her photographer partner and three cardigan welsh corgis. She is represented by several galleries up and down the East Coast of the United States