Featured Artists

November: Regina Martin and Steve Wilson

Regina Martin

Give a brief description of your upcoming show. And what might have inspired it.

In the past year I have been “getting lost” in Lancaster County with a dear friend on photo journeys, slowing down the pace of a hectic week and taking the time to look closely at the beauty that surrounds us each day.

How have you expanded existing themes/ideas for which you are best known/or if this body of work is a great deviation from your norm, what inspired this new approach?

This series is a more deeply focused endeavor to capture the soul and life of local barns.

Stylistically and/or technically, what do you hope collectors notice in your new work?

I have always appreciated the unique and very individual personality of farms/barns. In this series I went out of my comfort zone to pay attention to straight lines and edges, while still trying to capture the organic nature of farm life.

 

Steve Wilson

Give a brief description of your upcoming show. And what might have inspired it.

The paintings for this show reflect the beauty of the landscapes of Lancaster and Chester counties in Pennsylvania.   In the hustle and bustle of daily life, it is so easy to take for granted the splendor that nature reveals.  A blooming magnolia, a distant farm as the dogwoods share their spring colors, the glimmer of a river town and the decay of the bee nest with the intricacies of its perfect comb exposed. I find it amazing to notice these images and capture the colors and shadows.  As I recreate the moment in time with its beauty and splendor, I realize that pausing to notice the small things around me each day, helps me to see that there is no place like home.

How have you expanded existing themes/ideas for which you are best known/or if this body of work is a great deviation from your norm, what inspired this new approach?

Due to my love of the outdoors, I often paint small scenes from nature or larger landscapes and cityscapes.  I am constantly intrigued by the the colors, shadows and angles that are apparent when I take the time to notice. A composition based on the lively yet subtle colors and patterns in the bricks of the row houses captures the turn of the century architecture of Lancaster City.  The view of Wrightsville that is familiar to many people as they pass over the bridge, has a slightly different appeal from my kayak on the Susquehanna River. The beauty of the magnolia in my neighbor Cindy’s yard goes unnoticed by others as they pass by in a hurry to meet their next deadline. I stop and notice the scenes around me and hope that others see the beauty in their immediate environment and realize, as I do, that there is no place like home.

As I began my work on this series of paintings, I was drawn to the images that I see daily.  I began to recall the images of the farms at sunset with an ominous sky, the repetitious houses in the city, the blossoms in the spring and the thaw of the late winter. I want all who view this collection to look beyond the common scene of the day and observe the intrigue that I saw and captured through my realistic interpretation of the scenes near home as depicted in watercolor.

Stylistically and/or technically, what do you hope collectors notice in your new work?

In watercolor there are many varied techniques. This summer I had the fortune to view a large show of the work of Andrew Wyeth.  I have always been inspired by his work.  As I painted this series, I incorporate various techniques that are common to the Wyeth paintings, in order to enhance my style.  You will notice that some of the paintings have a large wash which can portray the graduated fill of color while in others the use of dry brush creates rough texture that better depicts the surface of the object that is being painted. Regardless of the technical aspects of the paintings, it is my hope, that those who view this work will take this theme beyond the show and pause to observe the beauty around them and realize that there is no place like home.